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  1. THEY STILL SMILE (ONI WSIO ¯E ULYBAJUTSA) 17`

  2. Belarus 2002

    Dir. Irina Sizova

    documentary

    CIS/DISCRIMINATION

    A documentary film on the situation of gays and lesbians in Belarus illustrating a vital community functioning in a conservative and homophobic environment.

    Screenings: LABORATORIUM Saturday, Dec. 7, 10:00 

    (before REPORTING FROM A RABBIT HUTCH)

    KINO.LAB Sunday, Dec. 8, 12:45n B

    Followed by a talk with the film’s director 

    Meet with the film’s director, Irina Sizova, and festival guests from Africa and CIS on Saturday, Dec. 7 at 13:40 LABORATORIUM
     

  3. REPORTING FROM A RABBIT HUTCH (REPORTA¯ I¯ KLIETKI DLA KROLIKOW) 40`

  4. Belarus 2001

    Dir. Victor Dashuk

    documentary

    CIS/ MISSING

    Lukaszenko’s Belarus. The main topic of the film is the liquidation of the president’s political opponents, including many of his former associates. The protagonists of this film not only speak of the “disappearances” and £ukaszenko, but also try to describe the state of Belarussian society – primarily characterized by passivity and fear.

    Reporting from a Rabbit Hutch was awarded an Honorary Diploma at this year’s Cracow Film Festival

    Screening: LABORATORIUM Saturday, Dec. 7, 10:00 (after They Still Smile) 
     
     

  5. CHECHEN LULLABYE (IL ÉTAIT UNE FOIS LA TCHÉTCHÉNIE) 57`

  6. France 2000

    Dir. Nino Kirtadze 

    documentary

    CIS

    Five war correspondents from various Western countries talk about their professional and personal experiences during the last war in Chechnya. The journalists’ frustration and discouragement are explained by the indifference in the West to the Chechen tragedy, and the lack of response by the international community to the evidence of genocide.

    Screening: LABORATORIUM Saturday, Dec. 7, 12:35 (followed by a meeting with festival guests from Africa and CIS)

    LABORATORIUM Sunday, Dec.8, 19:00

    Selected from this year’s repertoire of the One World International Human Rights Film Festival in Prague
     
     
     
     

  7. SCHIZOPHRENIA (SCHIZOFRENIA) 57`

  8. Poland/France 2001

    Dir. Vita ®elakeviciute

    documentary

    CIS

    Schizophrenia portrays the radical betrayal of the Hippocratic oath by psychiatrists in the former USSR who committed healthy people to psychiatric hospitals for political reasons. The narratives of the former patients, institutionalized against their will, are interwoven with the doctors’ statements and imaginative diagnoses.
     
     

    Screenings: KINO.LAB Friday, Dec. 6, 18:00

    The director, Vita ®elakeviciute, will meet with the audience following the screening at 19:00

    LABORATORIUM Saturday, Dec. 7, 19:10

    Following the film, meet with the film’s director, and festival guests from Africa and CIS at 20:10
     
     

  9. WE WERE HEROES THEN, PART II - GRASS WILL GROW EVEN THROUGH ASPHALT 79` (DAMALS WAREN WIR HELDEN... TEIL 2: GRAS WÄCHST SOGAR DURCH ASPHALT!)

  10. Germany 2002

    Dir. Lorenz Kloska and Sasza Winogradow

    documentary

    CIS

    Problems with freedom of expression in totalitarian states are by no means limited to freedom of speech. This is a richly documented biography of a truly underground avant-garde in the former Soviet Union. Oscar Rabin, Vadim Filimonov, Dmitri Shagin and other “unofficial” artists did not comply with the socialist-realist model required at the time. Among their reflections are an enormous, illegal outdoor exhibit outside of Moscow that in the 1970’s drew crowds and exhibits in private apartments hindered by the communist authorities. 

    Screening: KINO.LAB Saturday, Dec.7, 12:00

    [email protected]

  11. DAVID 31`

  12. Russia 2002 

    Dir. Aleksiej Fedorczenko

    documentary

    CIS

    A biographical documentary about a man whose fate was determined by overblown 20th century state power – from Nazi Germany, to the UK and France, Israel and the USSR. David, a man who experienced both Nazi concentration camps and Soviet gulags, tells his life story to the camera, and archive film material depict the world in which he grew up.

    Screening: LABORATORIUM Sunday, Dec. 8, 11:00

  13. DARK SIDE OF THE WORLD (ODVRÁCENÁ STRANA SV?TA) 25` 

  14. Czech Republic 2000 

    Dir. Pavel Hanus 

    documentary

    CIS

    A shocking and literal portrait of the last war in Chechnya filmed by two Czech journalists, Petra Procházková and Jaromír ©tìtina, in November and December 1999. Petra Procházková managed to enter Samaszka (under Russian occupation) where she filmed the testimonies of the townspeople. The entire film is a testimony, all the more valuable considering the Russian army’s attempts to keep journalists out of the war zone. Czech Public Television together with the People in Need Foundation, a humanitarian organization active in Chechnya, produced this film. Igor Blazevic of People in Need Foundation will take part in the panel discussion on Chechnya following the film.

    Screening: LABORATORIUM Sunday, Dec. 8 12:00

    Panel discussion on Chechnya to follow the film at 12:30

    Selected from this year’s repertoire of the One World International Human Rights Film Festival in Prague

  15. IMPUNITY RULES IN CHAD (L'IMPUNITÉ R?GNE AU TCHAD) 12`

  16. Holland 2002

    Dir. Willem Offenberg

    documentary

    AFRICA

    Amnesty International filmed this portrait of Jacqueline Moude?na, winner of this year’s Martin Ennals Award – an international award for human rights activists by 10 renowned non-governmental organizations (including Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch). Risking her personal safety Moude?na has documented numerous cases of human rights violations by the Habré regime in Chad and offers legal aid to victims of these violations.

    Screening: LABORATORIUM Saturday, Dec. 7 , 11:15 (after Africa in the XXI Century. Zimbabwe and South Africa - Still Far from Coexistence)

    www.MartinEnnalsAward.org

  17. AFRICA IN THE 21ST CENTURY. ZIMBABWE AND SOUTH AFRICA – STILL FAR FROM COEXISTENCE (AFRICA NIJYU-ISSEIKI KAKURI SARETA HITOBITO HIKISAKARETA DAICHI - NAN A, ZIMBABWE) 49`

  18. Japan 2002

    Dir. Kazuta Hioki

    documentary

    AFRICA

    South Africa, only recently free from apartheid and Zimbabwe, independent for years now, are both still struggling with the aftermath of colonialism. Several significant human rights issues are dealt with in this well balanced film: access to AIDS medicine, violence towards white farmers and the occupation of their land by blacks, and the controversial issue of reparations for post-colonial states.

    Screening: LABORATORIUM Saturday, Dec. 7, 11:15 (after IMPUNITY RULES IN CHAD)

  19. MASTERS AND SLAVES (MAITRES ET ESCLAVES) 84`

  20. France 2001

    Dir. Bernard Debord

    documentary

    AFRICA/ SLAVERY TODAY

    Despite the legal prohibition of slavery in Niger – it has survived. The main protagonists of the film – two black women- were once slaves in Tuareg country. One of the women has decided to seek compensation for 18 years of servitude and is being assisted by the Timidria Association. The other is trying to free her teenage daughter who is still a slave. The unhurried narrative in Debord’s film complements the lifestyle of the desert people. This film takes us on a quest for justice into the heart of a contemporary feudal society revealing the complex relationships between masters and slaves and their unimaginable reality. 
     
     

    screening: LABORATORIUM Saturday, Dec. 7, 16:10

  21. SOLDIER BOYS 52`

  22. Canada 2001

    Dir. Christa Schadt

    documentary

    AFRICA/ SLAVERY TODAY

    One of the parties involved in the civil war in northern Uganda is an army of children – boys between the ages of 5 and 16 kidnapped and forced to fight by Joseph Kony, the self-declared general of the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA). Kony claims that he is carrying out the orders of spirits that have possessed him. Since 1993 he has kidnapped and terrorized 15,000 children forcing them to take up arms and kill. Another party to the civil war is the Holy Spirit Movement led by Alice Lakwena who is also listening to spirits. Lakwena uses atypical battle tactics such as singing Christian hymns while marching without arms against armed battalions. The film’s main protagonist, Paska Otto, a former child soldier in Lakwena’s army, has returned from Canada to confront the demons of her past. As we accompany her on her journey we learn about the child soldiers of LRA, meet Alice Lakwena, and even catch a glimpse of Kony’s base.

    screening: LABORATORIUM Saturday, Dec. 7, 18:00 

    KINO.LAB Sunday, Dec. 8, 17:45

    www.hg80media.com

  23. REED DANCE (TANIEC TRZCIN) 58` 

  24. Poland 2002

    Dir. Andrzej Fidyk

    documentary

    AFRICA

    The creator of the unforgettable film, The Parade (Defilada) has made a film about Swaziland – the last absolute monarchy in Africa - a country plagued by AIDS. The reed dance is an annual ceremony during which young virgins dance for King Mswati III so that he may chose another bride from among them. The girls sing about condoms bringing death, that when there were no condoms there was no AIDS. According to a UN report over ? of Swazi teenagers will die of AIDS in the near future. Polygamy and sex at an early age in a country where there is no AIDS prevention of any sort have put Swazi society in danger of biological extinction. 

    screening: LABORATORIUM Saturday, Dec. 7, 22:00

    KINO.LAB Sunday, Dec. 19:00

    The director, Andrzej Fidyk, will meet with the audience after the film

    Co-producer of the film is TVP SA, Human Rights in Film media patron

  25. FALUN GONG'S CHALLENGE TO CHINA

  26. USA 2001

    Dir. Danny Schechter

    documentary 

    DISCRIMINATION

    The reaction of the Chinese authorities to Falun Gong, the largest and fastest growing spiritual movement in Asia, became a harsh example of how a state can openly and violently abuse freedom of conscience. The film is comprised of video and audio tapes as well as photos smuggled out of China to document the drastic human rights abuses committed by Chinese authorities in their efforts to liquidate the Falun Gong movement.

    This peaceful movement based on Taoist and Buddhist tradition showed no interest in politics, however, when its practitioners became the victims of the government’s brutality they did not lack the courage to resist and protest – the first public protests in China since the Tianmen Square massacre. 

    screening: LABORATORIUM Sunday, Dec. 8, 14:15

    www.hargrovetv.com/falungong.html, www.globalvision.com

  27. DIVORCE IRANIAN STYLE 80`

  28. Great Britain1999

    Dir. Kim Longinotto and Ziba Mir-Hosseini

    documentary

    DISCRIMINATION

    Shot almost entirely in one courtroom in Tehran, Divorce Iranian Style follows four divorce cases – filed by women. This award-winning film shatters the stereotype of Iranian women as passive victims of an unjust system. The would-be divorcees use anything they can to get what they want: arguments, pleas, personal charm, and even lies and shouting. But it is Iranian law that forces them to manipulate and plead – only mental illness or infertility of the husband can justify divorce when filed by a woman.

    screening: LABORATORIUM Sunday, Dec. 8, 15: 40

  29. IT'S ELEMENTARY: TALKING ABOUT GAY ISSUES IN SCHOOL 78`

  30. USA 1996

    Dir. Debra Chasnoff

    documentary

    DISCRIMINATION

    “We can and must protect the taxpayers by keeping this kind of trash out of our schools” – Debra Chasnoff’s film opens with this statement by Senator Robert Smith, a Republican from New Hampshire speaking during a Senate debate on withholding federal funding from school districts that “promote” homosexuality. 

    This excellent documentary raises one of the most controversial issues in American society today: should schools teach young people about gays and lesbians? Bob Chase, President of the National Education Association, recommends the film to parents, teachers and community leaders- ”Schools cannot be neutral when we’re dealing with issues of human dignity and human rights. I’m talking about acceptance.” The film takes cameras into six elementary and middle schools, public and private, from New York to San Francisco to find out what happens when teachers bring up this heated subject in the classroom. 

    screening: KINO.LAB Sunday, Dec 8, 11:00

    LABORATORIUM Sunday, Dec. 8, 17:30

    www.womedia.org

  31. TRAFFICKING CINDERELLA 48`

  32. Canada 1999

    Dir. Mira Niagolova

    documentary

    SLAVERY TODAY

    Since the fall of the communist regimes in 1989 there has been an alarming increase in forced prostitution and human trafficking from Central and Eastern Europe to Western Europe and North America. International organized crime structures that make an enormous profit on these women are flourishing. Once in the hands of these traffickers, the girls (often teenagers) and women have little chance of breaking free. Trafficking Cinderella is Mira Niagolova’s debut as an independent producer and director. She is also the Executive Director of the Vermont International Film Festival.

    screening: KINO.LAB Saturday, Dec. 7, 10:50

  33. KIDNAPPED (PORWANI) 40` 

  34. Poland 1987 

    Dir. Marian Terlecki

    documentary

    MISSING

    This underground production of Video Studio Gdansk shows us several political oppositionists from Torun tell about their kidnapping by the secret service in 1984. When the film was finally broadcast on Polish public television (TVP) the investigation into the kidnappings was re-opened.

    screening: KINO.LAB Saturday, Dec. 7, 13:40

    www.videostudio.com.pl

  35. KINGDOM OF THE LOST BOY 75`

  36. USA 1996

    Dir. Joanna Lemley

    documentary

    MISSING

    Gendun Choekyi Nyima was six years old when he was kidnapped 7 years ago by the Chinese authorities. He is the youngest political prisoner in the world. The Dalai Lama – spiritual and political leader of the Tibetan people – recognized him as the incarnation of the X Panchen Lama – second only to the Dalai Lama in the hierarchy of Tibetan Buddhism. In occupied Tibet, religion is the last bastion of national identity, which is why the Chinese authorities have so intensively tried to control it. After kidnapping Gendun Choekyi Nyima the Chinese declared another boy the true XI Panchen Lama. 

    Till now no evidence has been provided by Beijing that he is alive and well. 

    screening: KINO.LAB Saturday, Dec. 7, 16:20

    Adam Kozie³, Tibet Desk - Helsinki Foundation for Human Rights, will meet with the audience following the film

  37. MISSING YOUNG WOMEN 75`

  38. Mexico/ USA 2001

    Dir. Lourdes Portillo

    documentary

    MISSING

    A highly artistic document of a Mexican town bordering Texas where over the

    past ten years hundreds of young women have been raped, murdered or have disappeared. City officials suggest that the women are at fault (“they’re all prostitutes”), the investigation is inept, and one clue leads to the police itself. Women continue to disappear and the passivity and incompetence of the criminal justice system have left the families frustrated, but determined to remain vocal

    screening: KINO.LAB Saturday, Dec. 7, 20:00 

    Missing Young Women is from the repertoire of this year’s Human Rights Watch Film Festival in New York where the director, Lourdes Portillo, received the Nestor Almendros Award 

  39. MOTHERS OF PLAZA DE MAYO 64`

  40. USA 1986 

    Dir. Lourdes Portillo, Susana Muñoz

    documentary

    MISSING

    In the 1970’s, the ruling military junta terrorized Argentina. No one dared speak out against the regime’s brutality except for a small group of women who till this day gather on the square in front of the Presidential Palace in Buenos Aires. These women refused to accept the disappearances of their children and grandchildren and desperately seek information on their whereabouts. Today they form a registered association demanding complete information on disappearances of their children and that those responsible for the kidnappings be punished.

    An earlier film by the director of Missing Young Women, Mothers of Plaza de Mayo was nominated for an Oscar in 1986.

    screenings: KINO.LAB Saturday, Dec. 7, 20:00

    followed by a panel discussion on missing persons at 21:15

    KINO.LAB Sunday, Sunday Dec. 8, 14:00

  41. PINOCHET’S CHILDREN (VOLVER A VERNOS) 83`

  42. Germany 2002

    Dir. Paula Rodriguez

    Documentary

    Three student leaders of the political opposition in Chile in the 1980’s – a portrait of a generation that grew up in a dictatorship. Carolina, Enrique and Alejandro were children in 1973 when Pinochet violently took over the country with his military junta. Their fathers were victims of this coup. Though the film tells the story of their childhood it also moves into the present and takes a close look at Chile after Pinochet, a country in transition and with problems not unfamiliar to Poles today.

    screening: KINO.LAB Saturday, Dec.7, 14:40

  43. CHILDREN UNDERGROUND 108`

  44. USA/Romania 2001

    Dir. Edet Belzberg

    documentary

    Edet Belzberg’s Oscar-winning debut portrays 2 years in the life of children living in the Bucharest metro and their fight to survive. Five children are the main characters in a deep and shocking portrait of children left to fend for themselves. In showing the attitude of passersby, social workers, parents and the church toward these children we are confronted with the condition of Romanian society today.

    screenings: LABORATORIUM Friday, Dec. 6, 18:15

    KINO.LAB Sunday, Dec. 8, 15:30

    Selected from this year’s repertoire of the One World International Human Rights Film Festival in Prague
     
     

  45. LILYA 4-EVER 105` 

  46. Sweden 2002

    Dir. Lukas Moodysson

    feature fiction

    SLAVERY TODAY

    Sixteen-year-old Lilya lives in a gloomy high-rise apartment complex somewhere in the former USSR and dreams of a better life. Her mother has left for the States promising that she will send for her soon. When it becomes clear that Lilya has been abandoned, she is left in a dramatic situation to make her own way. One day a caring and handsome Andrej shows up and proposes that Lilya leave with him for Sweden and start a new life. At the last minute, Andrej explains that she will have to get on the plane without him, but that her new boss will await her at the airport in Sweden.

    Lilya 4-ever, by the director of “Fucking ?m?l”, was nominated to the European Film Academy this year for the Best Film award.

    screening: KINO.LAB Sunday, Dec. 8, 21:00

  47. MISSING 122` 

  48. USA 1982

    Dir. Constantin Costa-Gavras

    full-length feature

    MISSING

    Based on the true story by Ed Horman Missing takes place in Latin America in the 1970’s. An American father has come to find his son who has disappeared during a military coup. Ed, a conservative and patriotic man, joins his liberal daughter-in-law in the long search. Sissy Spacek as Beth and Jack Lemmon as Ed have created impressive and moving portraits in this film that shows a society coming apart at it’s seams.

    screening: KINO.LAB Friday, Dec. 6, 20:30

  49. SHOT IN THE HEART 93` 

  50. USA 2001

    Dir. Agnieszka Holland 

    full-length feature

    The story of Gary Gilmore based on the memoir written by his brother, a journalist for Rolling Stone, Mikhail Gilmore. Gary Gilmore, sentenced to death in Utah for the murder of two young Mormons, where there was a moratorium on the death penalty, demands that his sentenced be carried out (1977). The film presents the Gilmore family when the brothers were children interwoven with scenes depicting Mikhail’s attempt to convince his brother to change his mind and his attempt to understand the reasons behind this decision. 

    screening: LABORATORIUM Friday, Dec. 6, 20:30

    Shot in the Heart was produced by HBO Films, sponsor of Human Rights in Film 

  51. SUNDAY 94` 
Northern Ireland 2001

Dir. Charles McDougall 

full-length feature

Sunday tells the story of the events of January 30th, 1972, when British Paratroopers shot dead 13 unarmed civilians, and wounded a further 15, during an illegal civil rights march in Derry, Northern Ireland.

The film, made with the full consultation and co-operation of the families affected by the tragedy, has been carefully researched over several years by an experienced factual production team. More than a hundred first-hand interviews have been conducted with British soldiers and officers, priests, politicians, medical experts and eyewitnesses as well as relatives. 

The drama-documentary examines the political context for ‘Bloody Sunday’, as well as the impact of the first official Government Inquiry into the day itself in 1972. The victims’ families could not accept the outcome – their decades-long battle for justice and pressure from the Irish government have led to a second inquiry conducted by Lord Saville since 2000.
 
 

screening: LABORATORIUM Sunday, Dec. 8, 20:50